Power Powder
Catherine Diyakonov
Vancouver Learning Network
Floor Location : J 140 N

The top items requested at various refugee camps and homeless shelters include toothpaste, shampoo, and body powder. I wanted to create an all-purpose tooth, hair, and body cleansing powder that is made from food grade, inexpensive ingredients.
My hypothesis was that an all-in-one cleansing powder can be formulated for the teeth, hair, and body using natural and inexpensive ingredients that would: (1) have a high absorbency rate, (2) clean teeth, (3) have antibacterial properties, and (4) have a pleasant taste and smell.
I formulated my powders using a variety of food-grade flours, clay, baking soda, salt, essential oils, and stevia mixed in various proportions.
I first tested the six powders I created on their absorbency: I used water to simulate sweat, and oil to simulate the oil produced by your skin. My independent variables were oil, water, and the mixes I was testing. My dependent variable was the absorbency rate. My controlled variables were the number of drops of water and oil, the amount of time the liquids were absorbed, and the amount of each mixture I used.
Afterwards, I tested the mixes’ tooth cleansing ability. I soaked eggs in coffee, to represent stained teeth, and then scrubbed each egg with my six mixes. My independent variables were the mixes I was testing. My dependent variable was the cleansing effect and how white the eggs were after they were cleansed with each mix. My controlled variables were the number of times I scrubbed each egg, the quantity of each mix I used, and the level of the coffee soaked egg coloration.
Then, I tested the mixes on their antibacterial properties. I used a push/pull door knob to act as a dirty surface. I first used a sterile swab to swab the door knob and swabbed the bacteria onto an agar plate. After I completed all six agar plates with the swabbed areas which had the mixes applied to the door knob, I moved on to create an agar plate with antibacterial soap to see how antibacterial my mixes really were. Finally, I left one agar plate with no swabbed substance, as a control group, to insure to that the agar plates I used were not contaminated. I made a homemade incubator and placed all my agar places in it. I placed the incubator in a dark room for five days and checked the temperature every 6-8 hours (35°C). My independent variables were the six mixes I was testing, the control group, the antibacterial soap, and an empty agar plate. My dependent variable was how many colonies of bacteria grew on the agar plates. My controlled variables were the number of times I scrubbed the push/pull doorknob with my mixes and the quantity of mixes I used.
Taste and smell were my own opinions.
I successfully achieved my purpose and confirmed my hypothesis by creating an all-purpose tooth, hair, and body cleansing powder that is made from food grade, inexpensive ingredients and fulfills all of my four requirements.