Sticky Situations
Nicholas To, Zechariah Noronha
R C Palmer Secondary
Floor Location : M 092 N

The purpose of our experiment is to eliminate the annual wastage of plastic and certain waxes and resins by chemically modifying everyday plastics to both solid and liquid adhesive. This provides alternate usage for wasted polymers in both food grade and polymers used in plastic as well as yielding the same if not better result as a general hot melt adhesive.
The strength of our glues were compared to trademark glue industries in order to provide a cheaper and sustainable way of making glue rather than purchasing it. We realized that if the polymers, waxes and resins found in plastics and other outside materials can reform when exposed to heat, then an alternative hot melt adhesive can be made. This predicted a result based on the conformities of polymers in plastics and textiles, and its ability to melt due to high heat, as it will allow for a hot melt adhesive that maintains its structural integrity and allow for sticking.
If the polymers, waxes and resins found in plastics and other outside materials can reform when exposed to heat, then, as a result, an alternate hot melt adhesive to the general hot melt adhesive can be made. This predicted result is based on the conformities of polymers in plastics and textiles and its ability to melt due to high heat, as it will allow for a hot melt adhesive that maintains its structural integrity and allow for sticking.

Through each trial we observed that our solid hot melt adhesive outperformed our liquid adhesive and commercial liquid adhesive, yet matched the strengths of the commercial solid hot melt adhesive, revealing the predominant trend. Though the strengths of the other glues were formidable, by collapsing the plastics and layering the polymers using a significant heat source, it would result in a dense adhesive that contained more polymer chains that are joined together than the two liquid hot melt adhesives, similar to the the commercial adhesive. Proving the trend seen between our solid adhesive and the commercial adhesive. This conclusion however, laid stake our liquid adhesive, which failed to perform as expected. In other words, we observed a declining trend in performance between our liquid adhesive and the commercial adhesive, this however was a catalyst of it’s failure to dissolve to form a cohesive substance as is seen in the observation table.
We can see the average weight that each glue can withstand, when we contrast this with our comparative charts we can prove beyond reasonable doubt that our solid hot melt adhesive and the commercial adhesive are the best. Yet, when factoring efficiency, manufacturing costs, and the strain each of the glues place on our environment, we can consider the commercial adhesives equal to our homemade adhesive when weighing those factors out. With an average weight withstood of 0.75kg, a manufacturing cost of about 70 cents, and the incentive of saving the environment, it's safe to say that our solid hot melt adhesive has justified itself, therefore proving our hypothesis successful.