Blue Light Blocking Glasses - Does it Do What it Promises
Jason Lee
St George's School
Floor Location : J 192 H

The purpose of my experiment is to investigate whether blue light blocking glasses (BBG) reduce the impact of blue light on the time taken to fall asleep. Blue light emitted from screens reduces the production of melatonin which makes falling asleep difficult. Therefore, screen time prior to bedtime can increase time taken to fall asleep. This research will explore the plausible reason behind why people have trouble sleeping due to extensive use of digital technology by relating blue light exposure to time taken to fall asleep. Participants will have 2 hours of screen time each night. They will spend 3 nights without BBG and 3 nights with BBG. The results of this study will determine whether BBG reduce the impact of blue light on the time taken to fall asleep. Furthermore, a comparison of the effects of BBG on teenagers and adults will be conducted to see which group, if any, will be most affected. Previous study on this topic conducted the experiment under strict laboratory conditions on only teenage boys. My study includes both male and female teenagers, as well as male and female young adults.

Our findings show that wearing blue light blocking glasses during screen time prior to bedtime reduces the time taken to fall asleep by more than 25% for teenagers. However, the beneficial effect of blue light blocking glasses does not transfer over to the young adult group.