Memorizing Numbers
Sophia Colpitts
Dr Annie B Jamieson Elementary
Floor Location : J 019 H

These days, people need to memorize many different strands of numbers like phone numbers, account numbers, addresses, credit card numbers, and PIN numbers. Numbers are often hard to memorize because they are abstract. My project tests if people can memorize a string of 9 random numbers better aurally or visually. My hypothesis was that the test subjects would memorize the numbers better visually, because they are more used to learning visually with devices. I tested the students in my grade 6/7 class and each participant was given a visual test and an aural test. For the visual test, participants were asked to look at a paper with 9 random numbers on it. They had 35 seconds to memorize it and then they were asked to recall the numbers. For the aural test participants listened to a recording of a person saying the numbers over and over for 35 seconds. Then, they were asked to recall the numbers. The experimental results supported my hypothesis because people did better on the visual test than the aural test. The primary effect means that you remember what is at the beginning of something. This means that people would remember the first number better than the middle ones. The large majority of the participants got the first number correct, so the primary effect took place in my results. The Recency effect means that you remember what is at the end of something. This means that people would remember the last number better than the middle ones. A little more than half of the participants got the last number correct, so the recency effect did not take place in my results.